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Sports Book Reviews

This is the time of year for sports book giving and getting. Below are the top choices from your favorite critic. THE PATS by Glenn Stout and Richard A. Johnson (Houghton Mifflin $35.00, 365 pages) gets my vote for the best sports book of 2018. Detailed, carefully crafted, filled with fun,

No Heavy Lifting Book Review

No Heavy Lifting is the latest tome from Rob Simpson, sometimes author, always a morning radio host on Sirius NHL Network Radio. Versed on all sports, this book shows off his versatility and fun nature as he toured around the world chronicling many of his adventures. ECW Press has a winner

You Don’t Trade Players Like Noah Syndergaard

This isn’t R.A. Dickey we’re talking about here. That trade was explainable, and Noah Syndergaard was a part of that deal. Top prospect, Travis d’arnaud was the jewel of the deal. At least that’s what the Mets thought and so far it’s been the opposite and it will stay that

Shoeless Joe Remains a Scapegoat

With the recent announcement of a new class of inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame, the skeletons in the closet come front and center once again. Pete Rose and  and "Shoeless Joe" are becoming baseball's odd couple - both ineligible for the Hall of Fame because of a lifetime ban,

The Phillies Should Stay Away from Harper and Machado

Bryce Harper and Manny Machado are both unrestricted free agents. Teams with a lot of money should think twice before hiring either of these players. One team, the Philadelphia Phillies, should stay far, far away. Manny Machado doesn’t hustle. Saying he doesn’t hustle is an understatement. Phillies fans used to get

Remembering Wee Willie Keeler

With all the hype and hoopla about today’s mainly over-rated baseball players, with all the fuss about launch angles and shifts, “bullpenning” and instant replay over and over again by the non-stop talkers in the TV booths and on the field of play, it is refreshing to flash back to

Red Sox Flashback: The First World Championship

With the Sox on the cusp of winning another World Series, with fans all over New England savoring the time, a look back to 1912 provides a marvelous historical treat. Business in Boston virtually shut down on September 23, 1912, as  100‚000 cheered the Red Sox returning from a western trip

Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball

On July 16, 1889, Joseph Jefferson Wofford Jackson was born into a poor family in Greenville, South Carolina. He never learned to read or write. By the time he was six years old, he worked as a cleanup boy in the cotton mills. By age 13, he labored amidst the din

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